Examples Of Science Raft Writing Assignments

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Persuading the Principal: Writing Persuasive Letters About School Issues

Students learn that you don't have to raise your voice to raise a point. Writing a persuasive letter to your principal is a great way to get your opinions heard.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Teaching Voice with Anthony Browne's Voices in the Park

Students analyze Voices in the Park by Anthony Browne to determine how an author keeps an audience interested by creating voice and to applying that knowledge to their own writing.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Giving Voice to Child Laborers Through Monologues

Students present monologues in the "voice" of someone involved in child labor in England, respond to questions, and then discuss contemporary child laborers and compare them to the past.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Developing Persuasive Arguments through Ethical Inquiry: Two Prewriting Strategies

In this lesson, students use focused prewriting strategies to explore content and ethical issues related to a persuasive assignment.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Recurring Lesson

Tell Me Your Story: Video-Inspired Vocabulary Writing

Students watch a sample of artistic video clips online and respond through creative writing while using the vocabulary words they are currently studying.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

This is My Story: Encouraging Students to Use a Unique Voice

What did the wolf think of Red Riding Hood? Once Upon a Fairy Tale offers his side of the story and more, providing vivid examples of how voice enlivens narrative. After comparing versions of the story, students apply the concept of voice to Fractured Fairy Tales and other writing activities.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Writing Free Verse in the "Voice" of Cesar Chavez

Poetry and politics combine in this lesson where students write a free verse poem in the voice of Cesar Chavez.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Minilesson

Choosing the Best Verb: An Active and Passive Voice Minilesson

Students explore how active and passive voices are appropriate to different audiences. They examine online resources, and then draw conclusions about verb use, which they apply to their own writing.

 

Writing Across the Curriculum: R.A.F.T. Prompts for Science Class
building a writing prompt that challenges students to think deeply about science

Classroom writing assignments can feel very unauthentic to our students. Think about it. Students generally feel as though they--a single voice--are writing down their words to hand to an audience of one--the teacher--for evaluation. And let's face it. Usually the writing turned in to the teacher would register pretty low on Bloom's Taxonomy; like it or not, most student writing assignments ask learners to do little more than regurgitate information from notes or research. In the real world, no one writes like this, and thus, school writing assignments can feel very contrived. And our students are much more aware of this than we give them credit for.

Enter the RAFT writing assignment. Its sole purpose is to make writing feel more authentic in two ways: 1) students are asked to think and write from a real world person's perspective, and they are asked to shape their ideas to appeal to an audience outside the classroom; 2) because they are considering perspective as they go through the writing process, students are being asked to think at a much deeper level of Bloom's Taxonomy. It's no wonder R.A.F.T. writing assignment have become very popular in the last decade, especially with content area teachers who are looking for ways to use more writing across the curriculum in their classrooms.

What is a RAFT Writing Assignment? R.A.F.T. writing prompts challenge students to assume a Role before writing, to write for an imaginary Audience, to write using a given Format, to write about a certain Topic. This is a simple but powerful technique that will inspire more thoughtful writing from yourself or your students.

A Bonus Letter! Sometimes you might also assign your students a Strong Verb to keep in mind as he/she writes, transforming the R.A.F.T. prompt into a R.A.F.T.S. prompt. If you assign strong verbs like convince, encourage, assure, or sway, then you have just transformed the prompt into a persuasive writing activity, which registers even higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. In Northern Nevada, we features R.A.F.T.S. writing prompts at our Persuasive Writing In-service Classes and Workshops, and our math, science, and social studies teachers always find great value in designing thoughtful RAFTS together. On our R.A.F.T. Homepage, you can access the worksheets we use when we help teachers design these thoughtful, content-based writing prompts.

You can also let the interactive machine below help you design a serendipitous R.A.F.T.S. prompt. The five buttons below, once pressed, will help you begin to imagine a R.A.F.T.S. writing prompt about a science topic for you or for your students to write about.  If one of the button's choices doesn't seem to work, feel free to click it again.  Your job here is to create a R.A.F.T.S. writing prompt that you or someone else could actually write about and learn from while writing.

Ready to try?  Start clicking the buttons below until you have an idea for a R.A.F.T.S. assignment to be used in class.

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