Disaster Management Floods Essay About Myself

BEFORE A FLOOD (When Flooding is Forecast)

Be alert.

  • Monitor your surroundings.
  • Monitor NOAA Weather Radio, local television and radio stations, or go to www.weather.gov.

If a flash flood warning is issued for your area: Climb to safety immediately.

  • Flash floods develop quickly. Do not wait until you see rising water.
  • Get out of low areas subject to flooding.
  • If driving, do not drive through flooded roadways!

Assemble disaster supplies:

  • Drinking water – Fill clean containers.
  • Food that requires no refrigeration or cooking.
  • Cash.
  • Medications and first aid supplies.
  • Clothing, toiletries.
  • Battery-powered radio.
  • Flashlights.
  • Extra batteries.
  • Important documents: insurance papers, medical records, bank account numbers.

Be prepared to evacuate.

  • Identify places to go.
  • Identify alternative travel routes that are not prone to flooding.
  • Plan what to do with your pets.
  • Fill your car’s gas tank.
  • If told to leave, do so quickly.

Review your Family Disaster Plan.

  • Discuss flood plans with your family.
  • Decide where you will meet if separated.
  • Designate a contact person who can be reached if family members get separated. Make sure every family member has the contact information.

Protect your property.

  • Move valuables and furniture to higher levels.
  • Move hazardous materials (such as paint, oil, pesticides, and cleaning supplies) to higher locations.
  • Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch them if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Bring outside possessions indoors or tie them down securely. This includes lawn furniture, garbage cans, and other movable objects.
  • Seal vents to basements to prevent flooding.

DURING A FLOOD

Be alert.

  • Monitor your surroundings.
  • Monitor NOAA Weather Radio, local television and radio stations, or go to www.weather.gov.

Don’t drive unless you have to.
If you must drive, travel with care.

  • Make sure your vehicle has enough fuel.
  • Follow recommended routes. DO NOT sightsee.
  • Avoid disaster areas. Your presence might hamper rescue or other emergency operations and put you at further risk.
  • Watch for washed out roads, earth slides, and downed trees or power lines.
  • Be especially cautious at night, when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
  • If the vehicle stalls, abandon it.
  • If water rises around your car, leave the vehicle immediately. Climb to higher ground as quickly as possible.

NEVER drive through flooded roadways. STOP! Turn Around Don’t Drown.

  • The roadbed may be washed out.
  • You can lose control of your vehicle in only a few inches of water.
  • Your car may float. Vehicles can be swept away by less than 2 feet of water.
  • Do not drive around a barricade. Turn around and go another way!

Get to high ground – Climb to safety!

  • Get out of low areas that may be subject to flooding.
  • Avoid already-flooded areas and do not attempt to cross flowing water.
  • Stay away from power lines and electrical wires.

Evacuate immediately, if you think you are at risk or are advised to do so!

  • Act quickly. Save yourself, not your belongings.
  • Move to a safe area before access is cut off by rising water.
  • Families should use only one vehicle to avoid getting separated and reduce traffic jams.
  • Shut off water, gas, and electrical services before leaving.
  • Secure your home: lock all doors and windows.
  • If directed to a specific location, go there.

Never try to walk or swim through flowing water.

  • If flowing water is above your ankles, STOP! Turn around and go another way.
  • If it is moving swiftly, water 6 inches deep can knock you off your feet.
  • Be aware that people have been swept away wading through flood waters.
  • NEVER allow children to play around high water, storm drains, creeks, or rivers.

Shut off the electricity at the circuit breakers.
If someone falls in or is trapped in flood water:

  • Do not go after the victim!
  • Use a floatation device. If possible throw the victim something to help them float, such as a spare tire, large ball, or foam ice chest.
  • Call 911. Call for assistance and give the correct location information.

AFTER A FLOOD

Wait until it is safe to return.

  • Monitor NOAA Weather Radio or local television and radio stations.
  • Do not return to flooded areas until authorities indicate it is safe to do so.
  • Do not visit disaster areas following a flood. Your presence may hamper urgent emergency response and rescue operations.

Travel with care.

  • Follow recommended routes. DO NOT sightsee.
  • Watch for washed out roads, earth slides, and downed trees or power lines.
  • Stay away from downed power lines.

If a building was flooded, check for safety before entering.

  • Do not enter a building if it is still flooded or surrounded by floodwater.
  • Check for structural damage. Inspect foundations for cracks or other damage.
  • Turn off any outside gas lines at the meter tank.
  • Do not enter a building that has flooded until local building officials have inspected it for safety.

Use extreme caution when entering buildings.

  • Wear sturdy shoes. The most common injury following a disaster is cut feet.
  • Use ONLY battery-powered lighting. Flammable material may be present.
  • Look for fire hazards (such as damaged gas lines, flooded electrical circuits, or submerged furnaces).
  • Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. If possible turn off the gas at the outside main valve. Call the gas company.
  • Report broken utility lines to appropriate authorities.
  • Check for electrical system damage (sparks, broken or frayed wires, or the smell of burning insulation). Turn off the electricity at the main circuit breaker if you can reach it without stepping in water.
  • Examine walls, floors, doors, windows, and ceilings for risk of collapsing.
  • Watch out for animals that might have entered with the floodwaters.
  • Let the building air out to remove foul odors or escaping gas.

Take pictures of the damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance claims.

Get professional help.

  • Seek necessary medical care. Do not neglect minor wounds or illnesses.
  • Food, clothing, shelter, and first aid are available from the American Red Cross.
  • If the gas has been turned off for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
  • Have an electrician check the electrical system and appliances.
  • Wells should be pumped out and the water tested for purity before drinking.

Your home is no longer a safe place.

  • Throw away medicine, food, or water that had contact with floodwaters (including canned goods).
  • If water is of questionable purity, boil drinking water for 10 minutes.
  • Restrict children from playing in flooded areas.
  • Keep windows and doors open for ventilation.
  • Pump out flooded basements gradually (removing about 1/3 of the water volume each day) to avoid structural damage.
  • Keep the power off until an electrician has inspected the system for safety. All electrical equipment should be checked and dried before being returned to service.
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet.
  • Service damaged sewage systems as soon as possible.

When making repairs, protect your property from future flood damage.

  • Follow local building codes.
  • Use flood-resistant materials and techniques.
  • Elevate electrical components above the potential flood height.
  • Elevate utilities (washer, dryer, furnace, and water heater) above the level of anticipated flooding.
  • Consider elevation of the entire structure.
  • Install a backflow valve in the sewer system.

                                                                                        

 

DISASTER

Disaster is a sudden, calamitous event bringing great damage, loss, destruction and devastation to life and property. WHO defines Disaster as "any occurrence, that causes damage, ecological disruption, loss of human life, deterioration of health and health services, on a scale sufficient to warrant an extraordinary response from outside the affected community or area”

The damage caused by disasters is immeasurable and varies with the geographical location, climate and the type of the earth surface/degree of vulnerability. This influences the mental, socio-economic, political and cultural state of the affected area. Generally, disaster has the following effects in the concerned areas:

1. It completely disrupts the normal day to day life.

2. It negatively influences the emergency systems.

3. Normal needs and processes like flood, shelter, health, etc. are affected and deteriorate depending on the intensity and severity of the disaster.

 It may also be termed as “a serious disruption of the functioning of society, causing widespread human, material or environmental losses which exceed the ability of the affected society to cope using its own resources”

Thus, a disaster may have the following main features:

Unpredictability

Unfamiliarity

Speed

Urgency

Uncertainty

Threat

COMPONENTS OF DISASTER

Risk is a measure of the expected losses due to a hazardous event of a particular magnitude occurring in a given area over a specific time period. Risk is a function of the probability of particular occurrences and the losses each would cause. The level of risk depends on:

Nature of the Hazard

Vulnerability of the elements which are affected

Economic value of those elements

 Vulnerability is defined as “the extent to which a community, structure, service, and/or geographic area is likely to be damaged or disrupted by the impact of particular hazard, on account of their nature, construction and proximity to hazardous terrain or a disaster prone area”

 Hazards are defined as “Phenomena that pose a threat to people, structures, or economic assets and which may cause a disaster. They could be either manmade or naturally occurring in our environment.”

The extent of damage in a disaster depends on:

1. The impact, intensity and characteristics of the phenomenon and

2. How people, environment and infrastructures are affected by that phenomenon

 

This relationship can be written as an equation:

 

 

DISASTER RISK = HAZARD + VULNERABILITY 

TYPES OF

Generally, disasters are of two types – Natural and Manmade. Based on the devastation, these are further classified into major/minor natural disaster and major/minor manmade disasters. some of the disasters are listed below:

DISASTER MANAGEMENT AND MITIGATION STRATEGIES

Disaster Management is the discipline of dealing with and avoiding risks. It is a discipline that involves preparing for disaster before it occurs, disaster response  (e.g. emergency evacuation, quarantine, mass decontamination, etc.), as well as supporting, and rebuilding societyafter natural or human-made disasters have occurred. In general, any disaster management is the continuous process by which all individuals, groups, and communities manage hazards in an effort to avoid or ameliorate the impact of disasters resulting from the hazard.

Mitigationefforts attempt to prevent hazards from developing into disasters altogether, or to reduce the effects of disasters when they occur. The mitigation phase differs from the other phases because it focuses on long-term measures for reducing or eliminating risk. The implementation of mitigation strategies can be considered as part of the recovery process if applied after a disaster occurs.

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

Disasters happen anytime and anywhere. And when disaster strikes, you may not have much time to respond. An earthquake, flood, tornado, winter storm, highway spill or hazardous material or any other disaster could cut water, electricity, and telephones-for days, require evacuation or confine your family at home for days.

After a disaster, local officials and relief workers will be on the scene, but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours, or it may take days. So we should be aware and prepared to cope with the emergency until help arrives.

 

EARTHQUAKES: SAFETY TIPS

Before the earthquake: It is important to formulate a safety plan.

Always keep the following in a designated place: bottled drinking water, non-perishable food (chura, gur, etc), first-aid kit, torchlight and battery-operated radio with extra batteries.

Teach family members how to turn off electricity, gas, etc.

Identify places in the house that can provide cover during an earthquake.

It may be easier to make long distance calls during an earthquake.  Identify an out-of-town relative or friend as your family’s emergency contact.  If the family members get separated after the earthquake and are not able to contact each other, they should contact the designated relative/friend.  The address and phone number of the contact person/relative should be with all the family members.

Consider retrofitting your house with earthquake-safety measures to safeguard your house. Reinforcing the foundation and frame could   make your house quake resistant.  You may consult a reputable contractor and follow building codes.

Kutchha building can also be retrofitted and strengthened.

During the earthquake: Earthquakes give no warning at all. Sometimes, a loud rumbling sound might signal its arrival a few seconds ahead of time. Those few seconds could give you a chance to move to a safer location. Here are some tips for keeping safe during a quake.

Take cover. Go under a table or other sturdy furniture; kneel, sit, or stay close to the floor. Hold on to furniture legs for balance. Be prepared to move if your cover moves.

If no sturdy cover is nearby, kneel or sit close to the floor next to a structurally sound interior wall. Place your hands on the floor for balance.

Do not stand in doorways. Violent motion could cause doors to slam and cause serious injuries. You may also be hit by flying objects.

Move away from windows, mirrors, bookcases and other unsecured heavy objects.

If you are in bed, stay there and cover yourself with pillows and blankets.

Do not run outside if you are inside. Never use the lift.

If you are living in a kutcha house, the best thing to do is to move to an open area where there are no trees, electric or telephone wires.

Move into the open, away from buildings, streetlights, and utility wires. Once in the open stay there until the shaking stops.

If your home is badly damaged, you will have to leave. Collect water, food, medicine, other essential items and important documents before leaving.

Avoid places where there are loose electrical wires and do not touch metal objects that are in touch with the loose wires.

Do not re-enter damaged buildings and stay away from badly damaged structures.

If in moving vehicles:Move to a clear area away from buildings, trees, overpasses, or utility wires, stop, and stay in the vehicle. Once the shaking has stopped, proceed with caution. Avoid bridges or ramps that might have been damaged by the quake.

0 Thoughts to “Disaster Management Floods Essay About Myself

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *